Charles b.1859

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Charles Holbrough (1859-1917)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Like the rest, he was born and brought up in Winchcombe, Gloucestershire. He first appears on the 1861 census at the age of one month in Winchcombe in Gloucestershire, the second son of George Hawborough an agricultural labourer aged 26, living on Gloucester Street. However this was a mistake and should have been one year as he was christened in Winchcombe Parish Church on Christmas Day 1859.

 

 

 

 

 

 

prayer book frontprayer book back

Like his brothers and sisters, Charles left Winchcombe. We know that at the age of 17 in 1876 he was in Burnley  from an inscription by someone else in the front of a Book of Common Prayer, but he has inscribed his home address as Winchcombe in the back. Note the different spellings of the surname.

What he did and where, for the next 14 years is not clear. According to his daughters he was in service during this time with a doctor.

He next appeared on the census of 3 April 1881 in Buckley Hall, Wardleworth, Lancashire as his brother's visitor in the household of George Schofield, woolen manufacturer. His brother was in service there as a manservant.

It is known that he became a “Gentleman's Gentleman”

From Lizzie - daughter

    "Father was very refined. He was a gentleman's gentleman or a butler with Dr. East (and/or Dr. Blair) and he used to travel with him. He came to Goole with him. There he married mother and Uncle Will got him on the docks.”

From Ivy - daughter

    “Dad was really refined and I always wondered where he got it from - I didn't know until he died. He was a gentleman's gentleman and he came to Goole with either a Dr. Blair or a Dr. East. Then we found under a bed a pair of striped trousers and an old tailcoat and they were what he used to wear as a butler. Jim, Arthur, Roy and me, we used to dress up in these. There was also a little bottle of pink ointment and we wondered what that was too. Evidently one time there was a big dinner in London and he was waiting on and he ran into a door and he had to mix this stuff up to hide his bruise. Apparently he used to travel with this Dr. East.

    He met Uncle Will and mother while he was here and when Dr. East went back to wherever he came from, Dad married mother and stayed.”

By 1890 he was in Goole

This was a booming ‘New Town’ created by the coming of the Docks and the railways and offering plenty of jobs and good wages.

1bJane Ann Holbrough nee WilsonIn 1890 Charles married Jane Ann Wilson on 2nd March 1890 at Goole Parish Church. He was then described as a Labourer, aged 29 living at 2 Abassinia Terrace, Goole, and his father was given as George Holbrow a labourer.

His bride, Jane Ann Wilson  said that she was 18 but was actually only 17. She gave her address as the same as his (Apparently he was a lodger with in the same house) and the boxes for her father are left blank.

The witnesses are William Stainton and M.J. Glew.

 

In the 1901 Census  for 5 Spencer Street, Goole Charles  is a Dock Labourer in Goole aged 40, with his wife Jane aged 29, son George aged 8, daughter Clara aged 7, son Charles aged 5 and daughter Jane aged 11 months. His brother George is staying with them. He is aged 26, single and is described as a Railway Point Shunter.

In the early 1900’s the family moved to the little village of Hook

They were to have thirteen children

 

Charles Holbrough’s Working Life

From Ivy - daughter

    “He met Uncle Will (Epworth) and mother while he was here and when Dr. East went back to wherever he came from, Dad married mother and stayed. He had no work so Uncle Will got him on the docks as a checker - checking the goods as they came in by crane.” 

From Lizzie - daughter

    “Uncle Will got him on the docks. He was a checker - as the goods came in by crane. Then he had a bad accident with a crane to his head and eventually he had to give in.”

Work on the docks was much better paid than being an Agricultural Labourer, but in many cases, employment was only casual and paid on a half day basis. Only a favoured few worked a full week.

 Dock Work In Liverpool - 1871  Notional wage rates

 

Per day

Per 6 day week

Overtime (night shift)

Stevedores

 7s

42s

13s

Shipmen 

5s

30s

8s

Quay Porters

4s 6d

27s

8s

In 1883 a Railway Porter in Liverpool was earning 24s per week

Railway employment gave fringe benefits: Free or cheap rail travel and regular leave (without pay) plus the chance to better yourself with promotion. But it was hazardous work, with harsh discipline and long hours.

See the History of Goole for details and photos of the town

 

By the 1891 Census Charles Frederick Holbrough was married and living in Goole. His address was Back side Andrews Terrace and he was a railway porter.

In the 1901 Census  for 5 Spencer Street, Goole he is a Dock Labourer in Goole aged 40, with his wife Jane aged 29, son George aged 8, daughter Clara aged 7, son Charles aged 5 and daughter Jane aged 11 months. His brother George is staying with them.

Charles Holbrough died in October 1917. By this time the family had moved to the village of Hook

From Eric (son)

    "I didn't know anything about my dad except that he worked on the railways and he was killed there. He was a plate layer, laying lines and as far as I know a line slipped and he was in the way."

From Lizzie - daughter

    “When the war came he went on the railway taking up tracks with Mr. Morton. One end hit his head and he died within quarter of an hour. He had a railway carriage office and was allowed one shilling per night while the men were only allowed 6d. He stayed with Mr. & Mrs. Lane of Anlaby Lane, Hull.

    The night before he died he had been training Eric to walk and then had cleaned all of the lads brasses. Then he had been hammering in nails and had frightened Ivy so he had gone up to her." 

From Ivy - daughter

    Uncle Will got him on the docks as a checker - checking the goods as they came in by crane. One day there was a bad accident and he hurt his head and he found it hard then with figures. Mother was a whiz with figures and she helped him as much as she could, but he had to give in, he couldn't manage it and then he went on the railway.

    The war came and there were no ships so he went on the railway. Well then I understand they were taking up these miles of rail for France and in taking up one end, this man called Morton had hold of it and he let it slip and it hit his head and within quarter of an hour he was dead.

goole times

Goole Times 24 Oct 1917

Hook Mans Death at Hull - Killed by Falling Railway Metal

    A verdict of accidental death was returned at an inquest held in Hull yesterday week on Charles Frederick Holbrough, platelayer, in the employ of the North Eastern Railway Company, who was killed on the Chalk Lane Sidings, on Wednesday afternoon.

    Deceased who lived at Hook, near Goole, was, together with William Rook, another Goole labourer, loading railway metals on to trucks. They were using hand crowbars and in lifting a line 21 feet long, the deceased's bar slipped and the metal struck him on the head. He fell on to another metal and was rendered unconscious. He was carried into a lobby and Dr Barker who was summoned pronounced life extinct, death being due to the bursting of a blood vessel caused by the fall.

    Deceased leaves a widow and eight young children with whom much sympathy is felt. For fourteen years he was the agent at Hook for the sale of "The Goole Times", having only recently given up the agency. Prior to working for the Railway Company he was employed for 35 years on the Goole Docks.

 

The Hull Coroners Inquisition Book (NC 1/9) has an entry for Charles Frederick Holbrough as follows:

    No. 7540 Date 25 Oct. 1917 CFH male 57 years of Hook near Goole a Casual labourer. Place of Death; NER Storeyard Hawthorne Avenue Sidings, Date of Death 24 Oct 1917, Verdict; Accidental Death, Remarks; Accidentally fell and struck his head against an iron rail on 24 Oct. Concussion of Brain, Haemorrhage into fourth Ventricle.

     

death notice

 

 

 

 

parish notice

 

 

 

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